The Do’s & Dont’s Of Riding Motorcycle in Singapore

Singapore is one of the most cosmopolitan and all-rounded trendy places in the World. There’s something about its emerging and somewhat unknown aura, juxtaposed perfectly with its fast-paced lifestyle that appeals to Singapore’s many thousands of visitors. And the same applies to the roads. They’re narrow and teeming with fast-paced traffic. That’s why riding motorcycle in Singapore comes with plenty of dos and don’ts. So, stay tuned – we’ve got your back!

1. Riding Motorcycle – Don’t succumb to biker prejudice

One thing you should know about Singapore is that there is a motorcyclist prejudice in quite a few areas. There are places where you will be thought of as useless, reckless, dangerous and, generally, less than drivers. Some people believe that motorcycles are dangerous and that riding them is just as threatening. But you cannot – whatever you do – succumb to such an incorrect and negative attitude.

Don’t succumb to biker prejudice. Instead, move on and persist. Overcome their pejorative thoughts and set a good example for bikers and subvert all of those age-old biker stereotypes wrong. We wish you all the luck in the world with this (admittedly, very difficult) ‘don’t’.

2. Riding Motorcycle – Don’t be a newly-qualified biker and miss the rules

Calling all newly-qualified bikers: this one’s for you. As we said before, there is a biker prejudice in Singapore and so their rule that all new motorcycle owners must ride lower capacity bikes must not be ignored. This rule is grounded in the belief that the right to ride a high power bike is earned, not just given.

So, acknowledge the rules when riding a motorcycle in Singapore and understand that your lack of riding experience may, in this case, warrant you to start from the bottom of the bike calibre. Assess your weaknesses, strengths and know your limits.

3. Riding Motorcycle – Don’t lane split on narrow roads

A lot of roads in Singapore are narrow and can be quite dangerous. They are made especially hairy by the closeness of cars on them, and so you must make sure you don’t lane split on these narrow roads with their slim lanes.

Nipping between close, high-speed cars is not a great idea. Avoid lane splitting on narrow roads and you’ll be fine. No matter how fast you think you and your bike can go, it’s not worth the risk. All good bikers know that safety has to come first at the end of the day.

4. Riding Motorcycle – Do give way in Singapore

There are an awful lot of road traffic accidents in Singapore due to an arrogance and refusal to yield to other drivers on the roads. That’s why we say do give way when riding a motorcycle in Singapore – you won’t regret being one of the very few courteous people on the roads.

Do acknowledge vehicle’s signal intention and other drivers’ right of way. Save yourself the hospital trouble and overnight stays by simply giving way. You’ll thank us for using those precious extra few minutes later.

5. Riding Motorcycle – Do avoid the fast lane

Yes, we all love adrenaline. Some more than others, we’ll admit. Living life in the fast lane is often considered by many to be fun and daring and all things free. But it can be extremely dangerous, which is why we are advising you to avoid the fast lane.

There’s no room for failure when you’re in the fast lanes of Singapore, so we recommend avoiding it the whole time. However, if you can’t avoid the lane, or know you can confidently and safely overtake someone in the fast lane, then that’s fine. Stay safe and, most importantly, stay out of the fast lane.

6. Riding Motorcycle – Ensure you’re safe at all times

It’s incredibly important when riding a motorcycle in Singapore to stay safe at all times. You will need to invest in a good, sturdy pair of boots, some robust and biker-approved jeans, as well as a special motorcycle jacket. Oh, and a good helmet, especially for Singapore where the heat can get a little too much at midday.

So, ensure that you’re safe at all times and have knowledge of what to do if you’re in trouble and what to do, of course, to prevent it. Happy motorcycling!

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